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More than just skin deep – How Cosmetic Surgery is not just aesthetic

by admin

It is more than fair to say that the industry and practice of cosmetic surgery are viewed with some measure of suspicion and distrust by the general public. High profile victims of botched cosmetic procedures, aggressive marketing campaigns, and an especially unregulated non-surgical side have all contributed to a perception of dishonesty and greed on the part of the cosmetic industry. Many of the above perceptions are no doubt true of some practitioners of cosmetic surgery, but at botonics we hold ourselves to the highest of standards; we put the needs of our clients first, and their satisfaction with botonics services can be seen both through their testimonials and their continued recommendations.

The other commonly held misconception about cosmetic surgery is that it’s embarked upon solely by the vain; self-obsessed people with money to burn, looking to feather their egos, fishing for compliments and shallow validation in the most obvious way. This is definitely not the case; people choose to have cosmetic surgery for a wide variety of reasons, many are dealing with insecurities and personal stigma which have dogged them for years. For these people cosmetic surgery is the path back to self confidence and happiness. Cosmetic surgery isn’t about vanity; it’s about restoring quality of life to unhappy and vulnerable people.

While the physical improvements provided by cosmetic surgery are the most obvious, the positive psychological impact of cosmetic surgery really cannot be understated. A study conducted by the Clinical Psychological Science journal found that cosmetic surgery often led to general positive improvements in the quality of life of patients; attributing higher levels of self-esteem and a generally greater enjoyment of life to the successful completion of cosmetic surgery. This in turn was shown to lessen anxiety, and increase confidence in patients, especially when compared to the study group who had considered, but chosen not to have, cosmetic surgery.

The demographic of patients utilising cosmetic surgery to improve their quality of life is not always as obvious as people would assume. Another pervasive opinion seems to be that cosmetic surgery is solely for affluent middle class patients, with the time and money to invest in improving their lives and overcoming their insecurities and self-doubts. While the needs of such patients are often undeniable, and the positive influence upon their lives immeasurable, there’s also a large segment of cosmetic surgery patients who have no conceivable alternative but to elect for such procedures.

Home or workplace accidents can often have a considerable aesthetic impact on patients, leaving physical scars to go with their mental ones. Often, a key part of mental healing for these patients can be repairing these physical reminders of the trauma they have suffered. One of the most obvious groups to whom this approach can be very beneficial are wounded war veterans. Indeed, the very field of plastic surgery was developed during World War I, by Harold Gillies, who went on to pioneer and champion many of the cosmetic surgery techniques used today.

So, it is clear that cosmetic surgery is about far more than just vanity; it’s about regaining confidence and reclaiming your life from past traumas and insecurities.